8 Technologies that will destroy how we do business


Unleashing the Road Warrior

Unleashing the Road Warrior

I want a 3D Printer and a Filabot. The are two items on my bucket list. I guess that means I’ll be printing plastic, but the Filabot of course means that I can recycle plastic, so that’s a good thing right?

I was reading an article in the July-August edition of my favorite magazine, The Futurist about Tomorrow’s Jobs. If you have followed my various blogs over the years, you will know that I am driven by working smarter rather than harder, so the story about Goldman Sachs prediction about 8 technologies that are forcing businesses to adapt or die obviously caught my eye. The quote was about 3D printing. If you have a look through some of my other blogs you will find stories about 3D printing military clothing, printing human organs, my friend Vik Oliver’s work with Reprap and others.

So I was naturally curious about what Goldman Sachs thought the other 7 were. I was thinking self driving vehicles, eBooks, virtual and augmented reality tourism and education, eGovernment and all those menial jobs that don’t require human understanding and problem solving skills. So in a nutshell to satisfy my curiosity and maybe yours. The other 7 are:

  • eCigarettes. I know a few people who use these and I was semi-tempted as someone who gave up smoking over 20 years ago, to give it a try, but yeah, nah. I do wish they had been around back in the day though. I’m sure these were originally conceived by someone like Jules Verne and if it wasn’t for the power of the tobacco industry, we probably would have been using them years ago.
  • Cancer Immunotherapy. This is something I have read a little about on recent times. Who doesn’t know someone close who has had or has passed away from a form of cancer and we all know that often the treatment is almost as bad or worse than the symptoms. The concept of having your body able to combat cancer cells in the same way as we deal with a virus is compelling and hugely attractive.
  • LED Lighting. Energy savings of up to 85%, a longer lifetime and so many creative ways you can use it from the home to the car to wherever you are. This one has already become huge without us even realizing it. Something that many disruptive industries and technologies are doing. Is there one invading your turf that you haven’t acknowledged sufficiently yet?
  • Alternative funders for insurance such as pension funds that are willing to take a lower return. That’s a very interesting topic in my neck of the woods right now, where insurance companies who were happy to take premiums from the citizens of Christchurch seem to be reluctant to give it back after the earthquakes. Here are some stories from New Zealand’s Campbell Live Show on TV. CHCH
  • Natural Gas Engines for the freight industry. Funny reading this because my very first company car ran on CNG. Goldman Sachs predicts that by 2020 20-30% of hauling fleets will be fueled by natural gas.
  • Software Defined Networking. The cloud gets smarter. This blog is in the cloud and I’m writing it online, it is not stored on my hard drive.
  • Big Data. No surprises here. This is what I was saying earlier about the human element. Until we have a true artificial intelligence, we are still going to be asking the questions, so I’m hoping that problem solving people like me will continue to be able to find exciting and fulfilling work to do. This is not intuitive for many people and the more specialized the workforce becomes, especially in large businesses, the less innovative the companies become. Shareholders increase their expectations of Return on Investment from old products and business concepts, then when it all turns to mush, they wonder what happened. I have to say, it’s not big data, it’s the ability to understand what’s contained in big data and how to apply it. Ask the wrong question and the answer could hasten your demise.

So there you have it. Interesting isn’t it that fundamentally there is nothing particularly new here. Yet all over the world companies are clinging to dated concepts and wondering why they are imploding. The crazy thing is that what people want and need isn’t changing significantly. People still read books, they still listen to music, they still want to know what’s in the news, they take more photos in a day on mobiles than in the entire history of Kodak film based cameras, yet the traditional businesses that grew fat on those industries are going broke.

What I also find interesting is often the answers are in the exact places that those companies don’t look. They are with the customers, they are with independent consultants, often with little experience in the specific industries. They are not in the traditional spreadsheets and they are not in the typical boardroom (don’t get me started). Business As Usual is a great model for going broke and yet none of the above industries are significantly novel or bleeding edge. They are natural evolutions of what came before. Yet many leading brands don’t get it, or stubbornly don’t want to get it.

So whether you own a business, or whether you are looking for your next job. You had better think very carefully about your future. The answers are closer than you think, but possibly not where you are looking. Do you know where your knowledge base is? Do you know what your greatest asset is? If you’re thinking it’s in your IP, unless you own your people, you might find that very soon the value of your patents will be minimal and that your creative minds have moved on, in many cases with the suggestions and creative ideas you turned away, because you knew better.

Whoops, I have sort of ended up on my soapbox again haven’t I?

2013 in review


Happy New Year to all my faithful readers, lots of new blogs on the way which I hope you will continue to enjoy and comment on:)

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,000 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Ever Been Burgled? Tips on Buying Your Next Home (Read Time 2:38)


Luigi Cappel:

Your house is your castle, or is it?

Originally posted on SoLoMo Consulting:

If you don’t know by now, last week I published my new Kindle eBook, How to Buy a House, Using Apps, Maps and Location Based Services.

This link will tell you more about what’s in the book for you and how it can help you with your research, but I thought I’d share the Prologue with you, which sort of sets the scene for what life was like when the neighborhood changed after I bought my first house. The rest of the book isn’t like this at all, but I think it might help you understand some of the reasons why you might want to do a bit more due diligence using Location Based Services, maps and apps.

Prologue

THUMP!

It’s 2AM and I leap out of bed, grab the Fijian souvenir skull crusher club from under the bed, ready to deal with an intruder in the house.

I race…

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Buying a House? Get the New eBook Which Tells You How Using Location Based Maps and Apps


Luigi Cappel:

In case you missed it on the SoLoMo blog

Originally posted on SoLoMo Consulting:

We all know buying a house is stressful. Get it right and you can own your dream home, get it wrong and the dream could be a nightmare. It’s all about Location as Luigi Cappel explains in his new Kindle eBook ‘Buying a House – Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services’, new on the Amazon Kindle store today.

Buying a House Final Cover ArtThis unique book takes you into the world of mobile applications that take advantage of mobile and tablet functionality such as GPS and the camera, web sites and map tools that can help you do your essential research before you start looking at homes. Illustrations show examples and there are many links to apps and web sites from around the world.

We chose Kindle as a platform because it is universal. You don’t have to own a Kindle device, you can get free software for your PC, smartphone…

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2012 in review


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 4,700 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 8 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.


Originally posted on Imersia NZ:

Memories from a short distance of the Christchurch Earthquakes are many. POTS phones work if the telephone exchange is working, but cordless phones don’t. Everyone wants to use their mobiles to get information and the networks may have limited cell towers in operation. Information people need to access includes where are my friends, family and colleagues. Other key things include which roads are open, where can I get petrol, food, water, shelter, transport, help.

The public were asked not to make voice calls on their mobiles because most cell sites were down. There were some good web sites put together such as Google mash-ups, but they are only as good as the ability for people to access the Internet. For many that wasn’t an option, as was recently the case with Hurricane Sandy.

I was thinking today that everything seems to have calmed down in Christchurch and I…

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Social Media, Location Based Services and Opinions


  1. I had more than one person say, who cares about Foursquare and check-ins, Twitter said you had coffee and Foursquare told people where you had coffee, so what? 75% of the people we polled didn’t have mobile friendly web pages but a similar amount had smartphones. I guess they spend most of their time on the phone wondering why they aren’t getting enough business, but that could put me in the realm of opinion.
  2. This guy has empirical proof that Twitter doesn’t work. He says no one reads the articles that are linked to from his tweets. Well if I hadn’t read that, I wouldn’t be quoting and linking to him.
  3. This was an interesting story that several corporate people delighted in sharing with me. They said social media marketing is so useless that even GM is pulling out of it. It obviously didn’t occur to them that the problem might have been with GM and their lack of integrated social media marketing strategies that was the problem.
    So what’s your opinion?