Day One External Beam Radiation for Prostate Cancer


I was all geared up to start on Monday 7 December, but it turned out that they had several people starting with both chemo and radiation, whereas I’m just doing radiation, so they changed it to Thursday 3rd December. Minor problem, I was going to be in Christchurch so we met in the middle and yesterday morning I was up at 05:30 and on my way to Mercy Hospital joining the early morning peak traffic hydrating from a bottle of water I had to finish by the time I was about half way there.

When you have radiation treatment you have to have exactly the right amount of fluid in your bladder and your bowel needs to be empty. The water helps push your organs out of the way and stops them getting hit by the radiation beams. If you don’t have that right, they’ll take you off the table to drink more or have a bowel movement (one way or another) and then you have to wait while someone else goes ahead of you as they are treating around 100 cancer patients a day!

They told me this happens to everyone around 6 times during their treatment and I didn’t want that being me. This involves changing your diet, for me it means drinking a lot more water than normal (apparently I’m in good company, in that most men live their lives in a state of dehydration) and avoiding any foods that can create wind, because gas also impacts on the shape of your bowel. If anyone wants details, I can share them but the list makes it very difficult to eat at restaurants as I found in Christchurch.

So it was with a sense of trepidation that a. I would arrive at Mercy Hospital in the right bodily state and b. that I would arrive there on time.

Once I got there I was sent downstairs where I was issued with my lava lava in a nice yellow tulip colored bag, got changed and escorted to the control panel outside the radiation room and then into the room where it all happens.

Mercy ScannerThe 2 machines on the side make up the CT scanner. When I was prepped I had an MRI and a CT scan to measure the size, shape and volume of my prostate. The CT scanner in  this room is there to make sure that you are lying in exactly the same position as you were when they took the first image. That way they don’t kill healthy parts of your body. The part at the top is where the radiation beams from.

You lie on the table with your head on a little support and your knees on the blue half pipes. They prod you into place so that you line up as above and then leave the room. Like most scanning systems they have microphones and speakers so they can stay in touch with you while you are in the room.

Once they get started the CT scanner and the radiation head rotate around your body in one 360 degree circle. It felt like something out of a science fiction movie and just as I was settling in, thinking “this is interesting” it was all over, they came in and told me I was done and I could go. The whole treatment itself took about 1 1/2 minutes.

I got dressed, went to my car and drove to work for a $4 Subway breakfast sub and a coffee that I had been hanging out for (not from Subway).

Then something hit me like being knocked in the head by an out of control snowboarder in a white out. I felt overwhelmed for a couple of hours. I think it was all the underlying stress that I had been ignoring and the release that the first bout of radiation was completed, I had drunk enough, followed the diet strictly, hadn’t embarrassed myself by having to get  up off the table, all the time reading books and Doctor Google and thinking about side effects, planning for succession at work if I needed to call in sick, all the things I’m trying to get done at work before the Christmas break, a friend who had just passed away during the week, reassuring my family and more. I was in a funk.

I worked my way out of that and had a good day in the office (my colleagues have been awesome), went home and once again felt exhausted. I ended up crashing on the bed for a couple of hours after comfort eating some nuts and my mandatory Kiwi Crush (a pleasant part of my treatment diet).

Now a day later and I’m still feeling a bit tired, but much better knowing I am on my way to dealing with this cancer. I’m getting focused on the future. Things like adding to my bucket list (number one is of course beating the cancer) and looking forward to Relay for Life. My kids have started Team Early Birds. More on that later.

 

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5 thoughts on “Day One External Beam Radiation for Prostate Cancer

  1. Done with number 1, Luigi, congrats! I can imagine your feelings whilst driving to Mercy Hospital. Your exact and detailed report of the radiation therapy will help others.
    Love the way your kids stand up for you and support you. Have a wonderful weekend and enjoy your Kiwi Crushes (what exactly is this?)!

    • Thanks Barbara, Kiwi crush is like a frozen ice block in a sachet which you can eat or mix with water to make a fruit drink made from Kiwi Fruit retaining all the goodness and fiber. There is a clinical trial going on in relation to prostate cancer (I’m not on it as such), I don’t know exactly what the idea is, other than the fruit is known to be very good for people with stomach problems. As I touched on diet is an important part of the radiation treatment, purely to avoid radiating parts of the anatomy near the prostate, which could be pushed out of shape by something as simple as wind. If you like Kiwi fruit then it’s a nice treat anyway:) Yes, I have an awesome close family. Thanks again for your interest and support and hope you also have a great weekend:)

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