A gift for anyone looking at buying a house


IMG_2355 (2)It’s my birthday and I am celebrating it after a long (good) day at the office by thanking people who have donated to my Relay For Life 16 charity walk that I will be doing overnight with Team Early Birds on 19-20 March to support the NZ Cancer Society both because I have cancer and the many other family and friends I and my team have lost or are helping through their struggles due to this horrible illness. Thanks team for helping me keep my little birthday secret by the way lol:) The desk decorations were a nice surprise.

This morning before I raced off for work, I blogged a request for people to donate $5 to my cause and I have been overwhelmed by generosity of people donating way over what I asked for which is awesome. I am incredibly grateful and humbled. But, I am hoping for more. Just $5 from each of you is all I ask. Just because others are being enormously generous and I think that is awesome, if each of you give $5 I could double our collection for such an important cause.

Buying a HouseAs a thank you and to pay it forward, I have made my Kindle eBook free for the next 5 days. If you know anyone who is thinking of buying a house, this eBook could save them a lot of time and money and you and they (donating or not) are all welcome to a free copy from Amazon here. No coupon code, nothing, just click on buy now and it will come up as $0.00. Even of you feel you don’t want to donate, please feel free to download a copy anyway, no strings attached.

Just one little nugget you will find in the book is using maps to identify crime in the neighborhood you are looking at buying in. When I published the book, this information wasn’t available in New Zealand. Today thanks to the NZ Herald it is if you follow this link. This alone is worth the price of zero for downloading my book and if you don’t agree I will give you your zero dollars back, no questions asked.

If you do like the book, please leave a review> if you don’t that’s OK too:)

Thanks again to all my dear readers, friends and associates. You rock!

It’s my birthday and have a request


I don’t ask for much and I don’t need much. I am the worst person to buy presents for, ask my kids.

photoAs you may know I have prostate cancer and I am doing the Relay For Life, as per countless posts below. What I am asking for is for all my friends to donate $5 to my Relay For Life entry at https://aucklandnorthrelayforlife2016.everydayhero.com/nz/luigi. If you are in NZ it is tax deductible. The money goes to the cancer society, but I would consider it an awesome gift to me. Do it now.

I know $5 seems like such a piddly amount that it’s hardly worth the effort. But it is. I have a lot of friends and associates and if you all did that, it would add up to helping the cancer society deliver on the needs of a growing client base, big time. Every single person in New Zealand, diagnosed with cancer gets offered a pack with brochures and booklets giving them information about their condition and support services available to them. 60 people will be diagnosed with cancer in NZ today going by averages.

If you really don’t feel that this is something you want to do, here’s something else you can do for me instead. Guys. go get a PSA test. It’s just a blood test, and even if it comes up healthy, you now have a base line for future tests. I didn’t have any symptoms and his simple blood test led to us finding out that I have cancer. At this point due to my urging 13 men have had their blood tested and a woman has also had a lump tested that she had been putting off. 60 people are newly diagnosed with cancer in little old New Zealand every day. If you do, let me know, I’d love to know that I have helped more people.

How am I doing? One day at a time. The side effects are slowly reducing, but I’m generally nodding off to sleep from about 6:30-7PM every night which doesn’t make me very good company for my wife and family, but I have lots of support and lots to look forward to. My next meeting with the oncologist after another PSA test is the beginning of April, so I don’t have too long to find out how I’m doing.

iPhone 279The Cancer Society has asked me to do a brief speech at the Opening Ceremony of the Northern Relay For Life on the 19th of March at 15:45 before we start our 18 hour baton relay around the running track at the Millennium Institute. That will be a real honor and I have promised to keep it brief, but I will be thanking you. Come and check it out and keep an eye out for Team Early Birds.

So as to my birthday request. Got five bucks you can spare? Don’t do it for me, do it for one of the many people that you know or are related to that are battling or have battled cancer. 1 in 3 Kiwis get it at some stage in your life so you will be helping someone you know or care about. Don’t put it off. Do it now. If you know someone else who is doing the relay, donate it to their account, it all ends up in the same pot. And guys get that blood test.

Thanks from the bottom of my heart. In the meantime, I’m off to work. Busy day ahead before I catch up with my family tonight before I fall asleep again:)

 

 

12 People went and got PSA tests for Prostate Cancer


If you’ve been following my story, I’ve been asking for $5 donations for the NZ Cancer Society Relay For Life event where my friends and I will be walking around a track for 18 hours on 19 and 20 March.

I’ve also been encouraging everyone I can to go and get a PSA blood test AFTER checking their insurance cover, because as my insurance broker said to me once they found malignant tumors, “You are now uninsurable!”

image_1Today I was talking to one of my colleagues, who has also been a generous donor to this cause and he told me that he and 3 of his colleagues have all been to get PSA blood tests. That means that now 12 people have gone and had tests as a consequence of hearing my news. That is awesome!

Hopefully all 12 are clear and they now have a base line so that in future years they will be able to monitor their levels, which is how I found out that I have cancer. My levels weren’t high at all, but they were increasing consistently every 6 months or so, which alerted my GP to the fact that there could be a problem.

Thank you all so much for your support, whether it’s donations, offers to drive me around when I’ve been over tired, colleagues for supporting me when I’ve had time off work, cards, offers of places to stay for a break and the “how are you doing” comments, tweets, Facebook and LinkedIn messages. It’s quite overwhelming and I’m feeling very humbled.

Most exciting of all though is the people getting tested because of me. If I could save one life or reduce the impact on someone because they found out early, wouldn’t that be something! Go Team Early Birds!

Shuffling of Papers


image_4

HOPE

Yesterday I arrived at the Oncology office to see my specialist, confidently expecting good news. I thought that he would be telling me that my PSA had dropped to zero or thereabouts and we could start looking towards 6 monthly catch ups, despite the fact that the fatigue and frequent bathroom visits continued.

He shuffled the papers and took a little while, with a big confidence inspiring smile told me that not everyone gets over the radiation quickly. He reminded me that no one gets cured of cancer, the goal is to achieve remission.

I took confidence from his smile and asked him about my PSA levels. He had another look at the papers, frowned a little and then told me that they had increased by about 50%. He said that I am in the 5-10% of people who take 6-12 weeks to get over the radiation treatment, gave me a form for another PSA test and a script for more Ural and we arranged another appointment in 4 weeks.

So, not what I wanted to hear. I’m still digesting it and what it means. I need to take some action steps.

  1. I need to learn to pace myself at work and leisure. I’m not good at that. I’m at my best when I’m focused but when I get home I’m often asleep within an hour or less after walking in the door, even when I manage to get home early. Whatever I do one day impacts on the next.
  2. I need to drink more fluid. It was much easier when I was going to radiation for 8 weeks and had to drink my bottle of water before I got there.
  3. iPhone 145I’m starting to focus on Relay For Life and I hope you’ll join me in that, either supporting our team at Millenium on the 19th and 20th of March, either in person, or by making a $5 tax deductible donation Donation. $5 isn’t a big deal to any of us right, but I keep thinking what a difference we could make for people like myself if all of us gave $5. I’ve already used up the donations some of you have made with phone calls to the society, attending a support group (which costs money to run) and met people who get to stay at Daffodil Lodge for free because they don’t live in Auckland and it’s expensive to spend a couple of months here when you are getting treatment and not working.
  4. I need to see a podiatrist as I have a sore foot. I don’t expect to do 50km this year, that’s probably not consistent with pacing myself, but I don’t want to be cut short by a minor injury either:)
  5. As of this morning I’ve gone back on Pomi-T again. It didn’t help before, but I still have plenty and it can’t hurt.
  6. Focus on quality of life. Play my guitars more, write some more songs and have fun with my friends and family.
  7. Look forward to a better PSA result in 4 weeks time.

iPhone 274Thanks so much to you all for your support and positive vibes. It means a lot to me. I really am serious about the $5 donations. It may seem hardly worth the effort for the price of a regular flat white, but it truly is, both in lightening my spirit and in everyone giving a little, we actually give a lot. Can you do that for me? Don’t worry about the donations buttons for bigger amounts. I have so many connections, if each of us only gave that amount (which is tax deductible) it would add up to something meaningful for the Cancer Society, but each little one will also put a big smile on my dial and smiles generate endorphin which makes you feel good.

 

There’ll Be Days Like This


Damn this fatigue. Yesterday I got half way to work and turned around and drove home again feeling very guilty about the meeting I was supposed to be chairing and the work that’s piling up. Most of all being there for my teams in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

When I got home and went to change out of my work clothes there was a Harvard Studies paper sitting in my wardrobe which I had been meaning to reread. I have reading material everywhere and my apologies to OCD people who like to have everything in its place. Its about delegation, which has been a focus for me, but one I need to focus on much more because reading the symptoms of someone who is not delegating enough, it could have had me as the cover boy. Having read that, I started planning for the next day.

Last night I went to the North Auckland Prostate Cancer Support Group for the first time. Unfortunately there were only 3 couples there. The organizers thought it might have been because of touch matches at the club next door who had not only taken all the parks around the field, but even had a truck parked across the disabled parking area.

I met two men with advanced cancer, both of whom were retired, both whose cancer had spread to other areas, one is terminal and one whose cancer is now undetectable, but still having hormone therapy to make sure it didn’t come back.

The main advice I got from them and their wives was to take things a moment and a day at a time. Another was the benefit of walking, they both walk between 6 and 10km a day. I need to find a way to get back to doing that.

I set the alarm for 6:20 and started waking up about 2AM, isn’t t funny that when you are the most tired, you can’t sleep at night but you can sit down at 10 in the morning and fall asleep. I decided I’m off to work this morning and am going to do a stock take. Get an idea of where the true priorities lie for the rest of the week and focus on what matters, which is mostly the people.

I showered, took some medication which I have for night time (no it doesn’t make you drowsy and won’t affect my work or driving, but it shows where my head’s at). I had Van Morrison in my head.

I’m looking forward to getting back to Day’s Like This.

When it’s not always raining there’ll be days like this
When there’s no one complaining there’ll be days like this
When everything falls into place like the flick of a switch
Well my mama told me there’ll be days like this
When you don’t need to worry there’ll be days like this
When no one’s in a hurry there’ll be days like this
When all the parts of the puzzle start to look like they fit
Then I must remember there’ll be days like this

 

I should be peaking today


That is, according to the medical law of averages, today should be the worst day of my side effects after 2 months of radiation treatment for my prostate cancer and on average after today I should start feeling better.

That’s awesome news and a day I’ve been waiting for, or in fact, tomorrow should be the better day. The main side effect I’m looking forward to losing, because medications don’t help, is the fatigue. I’m looking forward to being able to get through a normal day at the office, or a little work in the garden or going for a walk around a classic car show without feeling totally wasted the next day.

Hopefully I will fall within the average, because some people’s symptoms continue for a few months.

The good news: I don’t have to restrict my food and drink any more which is awesome. I don’t have to get up at 5:30AM for radiation any more. I only have to wait another 2 weeks for some indication of success from the treatment and I have awesome support from my friends, colleagues and family. Seriously, you guys have been amazing, with phone calls, places to stay for a rest, cards and kind words on social media.

image_2Now I just need the energy to start training for Relay For Life next month. We still have room for a couple of team members as a few have had to pull out and we’d love a few more donations. I have a mission to get all my Kiwi friends (because a $5 donation is tax deductible) to donate $5 to the Cancer Society through the link above.

I also challenge my male friends to get tested. You don’t have to get the digit, just a little blood test will do and remember, before you get the test, make sure your health and life insurances are in order. I am now uninsurable. That little bit of advice alone is worth $5 and makes me one of the cheapest consultant on the planet.

Support for Cancer Sufferers and their Families


I want to say a huge thanks to everyone for their wonderful ongoing support. It has meant the world to me. The cards, text messages, messages on social media from Twitter and Facebook to LinkedIn, phone calls, offers of driving me to and from treatment, somewhere to stay and recover (had an awesome three days with dear friends in Mangawhai over New Year’s when I had 3 days off treatment) have been amazing.

One of the things that took a bit of getting my head around was my family and how my cancer affects them. We have lost some of our closest family members and friends to cancer and I didn’t always appreciate how everyone else in my family was feeling. It’s something I noticed at the hospital that it was often the partners that were really struggling. We patients are more focused on how we are feeling and how to cope with side effects, keeping up at work and on my part feeling guilty for falling asleep at 7PM or earlier every night and going to bed early, leaving my wife on her own, evening after evening for months. I’m still doing that and could be for a little while yet.

IMG_3524After I left the radiation clinic for the last time, with instructions from the nurse, not to come back, which I was happy to agree to, I went to the cafe for my last coffee and cheese scone, staple diet to keep me moving.

IMG_3486Then off to the car to head to work for business as usual. I was feeling disoriented.

For 2 months my life had been focused on getting up around 5:30AM every morning and heading across the bridge for treatment and now it was over. The card from the staff may have been a factor, because it was like leaving your job, something that had become routinely normal. I wandered around a little bit as I headed to the car. I sat there for a little while, looking at the card, looking at the smiley face stamps on my appointment. Thinking about the PSA test in 3 weeks time and wondering what the oncologist would have to say to me when we catch up in a month, especially given that my PSA tests had never shown me to have abnormal levels, despite the tumors. Will I be clear or will I need more biopsies. I don’t like the idea of more biopsies because each one increases the risk, even slightly, that cancer material if there is any left, could then be passed into my bloodstream. IMG_2289

Anyway, got to work and got busy, then when I got home, I found a wonderful message on the front door from 7 year old Madison, which cheered me up immensely.

IMG_2261Mads (and all my family) has been tremendous, she is very empathetic but also great and grounding me.

Then it was off for a family dinner at Genghys Mongolian Restaurant with my family. I took it easy on the food, but the taste sensation  was amazing, even though I stayed away from the garlic and spices as instructed.

IMG_2290The piece de resistance was a cake, totally unexpected given that it wasn’t my birthday, which neighboring diners probably assumed. This brought tears to my eyes after a long two months and long day.

So now we wait and life gets a little back to normal. I still woke up at 5 this morning, but i was able to doze off again. They say its all about attitude and I have always felt that I am a survivor. I have also also felt that I have a guardian angel, my Oma, who had a 20 year battle with cancer (after she was told she would probably not live past the first year).

You don’t get through these things on your own. I’m a bit of a loner when it comes to dealing with stressful situations. Cancer has certainly changed that. I now gratefully accept the good wishes, the offers of support, the prayers and constant goodwill from colleagues, friends, family, acquaintances and total strangers. I’m also extremely aware that I am lucky, there are so many people worse off than me that have amazing strength and great attitudes.

I am focusing a little more on what matters. Family, lifestyle, maybe a little self indulgence to come, because you can’t enjoy the fruits of your labors when you are gone.

My immediate focus beyond my next oncologist appointment is the Auckand Relay For Life. As you may know, my daughters have set up a team called Early Birds, which recognizes that if I hadn’t had those PSA tests, we wouldn’t have known I had cancer. My prognosis would be very different.

I don’t know if I will be able to do the marathon distance I did last time, but I will do what I can and have a great team behind me. Our team isn’t just about me, although it is what I asked for when my daughters asked what they could do to help me. It’s about all the people that we and our friends have lost to cancer and those who like me are battling it still. It is to fund raise for the NZ Cancer Society that only survives through donations, sponsors and events like this.

If you would like to help and support us, you can:

  1. Join the team. There are no limits and it really is an awesome 24 hour event.
  2. You can make a tax deductible donation. If all my friends donated only $5 (the minimum amount that allows you to claim back against income tax) we would be giving the society a real boost in supporting cancer research as well as facilities like Daffodil House, where some of the patients I met in the clinic were staying for free, and the many other free services they provide like booklets, a library, free counseling and much more, without Government support.
  3. Come along for a visit. Especially the survivors laps at the beginning and end of the event. I can promise you a very moving experience with hardly a dry eye in sight.

Thanks again to all of you for your amazing support. I can’t tell you what it means, even just to have a ‘like’ or comment on my blogs and my social media.